Wednesday, August 16, 2017

For Linfielders, Augusta, Georgia, means college football, not professional golf

Augusta, Georgia.

Located on the Georgia/South Carolina boarder, Augusta is Georgia's second largest and second oldest city, about 150 miles east of Atlanta.

For many, Augusta means a prestigious professional golf tournament.

For Linfielders it means a 1965 championship college football game and a racist incident after that game.

Although the incident was negative, Linfield’s positive response, delivered by Paul Durham, Linfield football coach, is a never should be forgotten part of Linfield history.

The 1965 Linfield football Wildcats won all three of its non-conference games and all five Northwest Conference games going into the NAIA (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics) championship playoffs featuring four teams.

In the NAIA semi-finals, the Wildcats traveled to Midland, Texas, and upset favored Sul Ross State of Texas, 30-27.









Hotel Richmond -- now Richmond Summit, a low-income apartment complex -- on Broad Street in February 2017. Photo credit: Google Street View.



Linfield and St. John’s of Minnesota traveled to Augusta to practice prior to the game. Both teams stayed in Augusta Town House hotel which was headquarters for the teams and NAIA officials.

In the NAIA Championship Bowl game held Saturday afternoon, Dec. 11, 1965, at ARC (Academy of Richmond County) Stadium in Augusta, Linfield lost, 33-0.

Following the game, the Linfield and St. John’s football teams, coaches and staffs along with NAIA officials attended the NAIA Football Hall of Fame banquet in the historic Hotel Richmond in downtown Augusta. During the event five were inducted into the “Hall.”

The banquet included a sit-down meal for everyone in attendance. While that was the plan, everyone from Linfield sat down. No one from Linfield ate.

But first, some background…

Linfield 1965 football team player Odis Avritt (see photo of Odis as a Linfield football player), an African American, said, “Several days prior to the team departing McMinnville for Augusta, following practice, I sought out Coach Durham. Many questions were on my mind regarding going to the ‘Deep South’ and it seemed appropriate to share my concerns with him and get some answers to my apprehensions. My main question was, ‘Were we going to be separated as a team?’ ”

During times of overt racial discrimination, it was not uncommon for sports teams staying overnight on the road to have separate lodging, white players and coaches in a hotel and black players and coaches elsewhere.

“Realizing that the furthest East my travels had taken me was to St. Louis, Missouri, and Midland, Texas (for the Linfield vs. Sul Ross 1965 playoff football game), the idea of Georgia was beyond comprehension. Coach Durham assured me that the Linfield Wildcat football team would be together throughout the entire experience. Coach always had a way with words and you could trust his guidance. He said we would stay together as a team and we did,” Avritt said.


RACIST INCIDENT IN AUGUSTA

After the game as Linfield’s players, coaches and staff entered the hotel’s lobby en route to the banquet, Coach Durham was told by the hotel restaurant manager that any "colored people" -- for Linfield that meant African Americans and people of color from Hawaii -- with Linfield would have to eat in the restaurant’s kitchen.

Coach Durham’s immediate response was, "Then we (the entire Linfield contingent) will all eat in the kitchen."

When told there wasn't room in the kitchen for everyone from Linfield, he promptly stated "Then we won't eat."

And, indeed, the Linfielders attending the banquet did not eat while all others at the banquet not affiliated with Linfield did.

Another 1965 Linfield football player, Bob Haack (see photo of Bob as a Linfield football player), said “There was no hesitation in Coach Durham’s response. He was a man of principles. He always did what he knew was right. His players were always a team and not a group of individuals. I have reflected many times over the years as to the lesson his action gave about racial equality to both teams as well as to the hotel employees.”

Avritt added, “What happened at the banquet was a testimony of the man Coach Durham was and his commitment to his players and team.”

In December 2015, a column in the Augusta Chronicle daily newspaper discussed Augusta’s history as 1964 and 1965 NAIA “Championship Bowl football game site.

The column said the games were financial losers with the sponsoring organization being in debt after the 1965 (Linfield vs. St. John’s) game.

On Sept. 7, 1966, according to the column, it was announced the bowl game was leaving Augusta for Tulsa, Oklahoma.


The column said the NAIA “thought a city with a bigger population and a bigger stadium would be better than Augusta. A.J. Duer, executive secretary of the NAIA, said he ‘had hopes that Tulsa will be the permanent home of our Champion Bowl.’ It wasn’t. Tulsa didn’t even do as well as Augusta, and would only host the 1966 Champion Bowl game. The following year it moved to West Virginia, then Alabama, then Texas. In fact, since the Champion Bowl left Augusta 50 years ago, 25 cities have hosted it.”

That being said, the championship game move from Augusta took place for more than just than finances. Wildcatville speculates because of the racist incident and Coach Durham’s lobbying, the NAIA football championship game would not be held after 1965 in Augusta even if the 1964 and 1965 Champion Bowl games had been profitable financially.

Coach Durham did not want any team to experience the racism Linfield experienced in Augusta.

The racist incident happened to a Linfield team coached by Paul Durham, who, year-by-year was moving up the NAIA leadership hierarchy and would have become president of the NAIA Executive Board, the association’s highest ruling body covering the schools within the organization. He rose to third VP of the NAIA Executive Board. But, in 1968 resigned because he was leaving Linfield to become athletic director of the University of Hawaii, not a NAIA member.

The racist incident didn’t happen to Linfield football in a vacuum. It happened at the NAIA football Hall of Fame banquet in Augusta with NAIA officials, including A. J. Dauer, NAIA executive secretary, in attendance.

In Durham’s lobbying to get the championship football game moved from Augusta, he didn’t have to describe what happened to NAIA officials what happened. They were there.


IN CONCLUSION










The Coach Paul Durham statue/monument (see photo taken 5/4/2017) on the Linfield campus is near the Linfield Health, Human Performance and Athletics (HHPA) building, which opened in 1989. 
Engraved text which accompanies the statue/monument includes…

… “Long before racial sensitivity became a national issue, Durham judged his athletes by the strength of their character without regard to race or religion.

“He made a strong unpublicized statement for human and civil rights during the Champion Bowl in Augusta, Georgia, in December of 1965. When a hotel official wanted to serve the Black and Hawaiian members of the team in the kitchen at the banquet following the game, Durham advised the restaurant manager the entire team would eat in the kitchen.

“When the manager said there was not enough room to feed the team in the kitchen, the team stayed in the dining room but there was no food served at the Linfield tables.

“As a result of this incident and his personal lobbying efforts, the 1966 NAIA championship game was moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma.

“Such was the profound influence of a man whose memory is still alive in the hearts, minds, and actions of those he touched during his distinguished career and extraordinary life. One of life’s blessings was to be a friend of Paul Durham. He was a beacon of light in the darkest of times.”

……….
WILDCATVILLE EDITORIAL
Twice, most recently in 2014, the Linfield Board of Trustees was asked by alumni to name HHPA for Paul Durham. Twice the board said no.
Durham was more than a football coach. He was an extraordinary person. A talented Linfield student, including in athletics and music, his successes after graduating from Linfield are storied. He was a respected community leader in McMinnville. His teaching skills and leadership of Linfield teams and athletics and impact on players he coached are storied. You have the Augusta story to look into his soul.
In its written proposal to the board in 2014, a group of alums said, “From the date (1989 HPPA) opened its doors to the present, (HPPA) has had a generic name while the names of most other athletics-related facilities on campus memorialize former Linfield coaches. There is one person alone, Paul Durham … who deserves the honor of having his name on HPPA.”
In the aftermath of the board saying no in 2014, funds raised by friends of Paul Durham, many of them his former Linfield players, paid to have a statue/monument of him created and installed near HPPA. In concert with that, his name went on the front of HPPA to repeat the fact the lobby and foyer inside HPPA are named for him. But, the fact remains, Paul Durham’s name is on the building and inside the building. But, the building is not, as it should be, named for him.

………..

Photos

-Odis Avritt and Bob Haack as Linfield football players. Photo credit: Linfield Sports Information.
-Coach Paul Durham Statue/Monument on Linfield campus on May 4, 2017. Photo credit: Wildcatville.

-Hotel Richmond -- now Richmond Summit, a low-income apartment complex -- on Broad Street in February 2017. Photo credit: Google Street View.

...............

See 'Linfield College Football history: Bowl and iconic games'

http://wildcatville.blogspot.com/2017/08/linfield-college-football-history-bowl.html

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Linfield Football first practice 2017 season 8/15/2017


Linfield Football first practice of 2017 season, 8/15/2017 at Maxwell Field/Catdome at Memorial Stadium.


















Among those watching Linfield football practice 8/15/2017 were John Schindelar of Linfield Water Crew and grandsons Micah and Blake Schindelar.



Sunday, August 13, 2017

Linfield College Football history: Bowl and iconic games























Some of the games represented here and in the accompanying slideshow were -- officially or unofficially – called bowls. Wildcatville selected others because of their perceived importance. Most of the images are of printed game program covers. In the cases where game programs were not available or did not exist, other graphic representations of the games are provided. 

1896: FOOTBALL STARTS FOR McMINNVILLE COLLEGE

-Oct. 24, 1896. First football game ever for McMinnville College (now Linfield College). Played in the afternoon in Newberg, the McMinnville Baptists lost to the Quakers of Pacific College (now George Fox University), 54-0. Linfield head football coach was A. M. (Arthur Marion) Brumback, later to become McMinnville College president. (Don’t confuse Pacific College in Newberg with Pacific University in Forest Grove.)


1907-1921: McMINNVILLE COLLEGE DID NOT PLAY FOOTBALL

-From 1907 through 1921, McMinnville College did not play football. In a March 27, 1906, meeting, the McMinnville College Board of Trustees prohibited football indefinitely because it was too violent. Sixteen years later, after football rule changes demanded by U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt were instituted, “the game’s image was bolstered. Its revitalized boosters included (the college’s) male students, who regularly lobbied to reinstate football. Their wish was granted” in a Jan. 10, 1922, announcement, said Linfield Magazine. The announcement that Linfield would resume football was superseded that day by another announcement: Trustees renamed McMinnville College as Linfield College. The new name honored Frances Ross Linfield’s late husband, a Baptist pastor. Her gift of property in Spokane, Wash., subsequently sold, assured the college's finances and its future.



1922: FOOTBALL RESUMES AFTER 16-YEAR HIATUS FOR LINFIELD COLLEGE

-Nov. 4, 1922. After 16 years of no football, the sport resumed with a 20-0 win by newly named Linfield College over Pacific College (now George Fox University) in McMinnville. On Oct. 21, 1922, Linfield lost a game 26-0 in Salem versus Willamette. Linfield called it a practice and it’s not included in its 1922 season records. Willamette records show it as one of it 1922 regular season contest. The game (practice game) was held in the afternoon. Linfield head coach was Maurice Pettit.



 1941: FISH BOWL IN ASTORIA

-Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 20, 1941, in Astoria. Linfield and a team of soldiers from Fort Stevens (Hammond, Ore., Clatsop County) 249th Coast Artillery Regiment (Harbor Defenses of the Columbia River) of the Oregon National Guard played to a 0-0 tie.

Oregonian said the game was “mostly a punting duel between Bill Stewart of Linfield and Al Wickers of Fort Stevens, with Stewart having a decided edge. Linfield had more scoring opportunities but could make no headway within the soldiers’ 20-yard line. Fort Stevens threatened only twice.”
An afternoon game, it took place on Astoria’s Gyro Field, later called John Warren Field. This was supposed to be the first of an annual Fish Bowl football game. One of the reasons there were no subsequent Fish Bowl football games may have been because the U.S. entered World War II on Dec. 8, 1941. Linfield head coach was Henry Lever.


1955: MYRTLE BOWL IN COOS BAY

-Sept. 24, 1955, in Coos Bay. Linfield lost 20-13 to Portland State College (now Portland State University) in the fifth Coos-Curry Shrine Club Myrtle Bowl, a benefit for the Shriners' Hospital for Crippled Children in Portland.

Linfield trailed 20-7 at halftime, said the Oregonian. It scored on a touchdown a PAT kick in the second quarter after recovering a Portland State fumble. Ron Parrish threw a 46-yd. completion to Frank Speyer, who later in the series scored on a 10-yd. run. Howard Glenn kicked the PAT.  In the fourth quarter, Linfield got its final TD (PAT failed) when Marty Bergen passed 26-yards to Glenn.

The night game was held at Marshfield High School Football Stadium. Linfield head coach was Paul Durham.


1956: ‘THE STREAK’ STARTS

-Nov 3, 1956. Linfield beat the College of Idaho Coyotes 20-7, during a night (8:30 o’clock kickoff) Homecoming game on Maxwell Field before a capacity Memorial Stadium crowd. It clinched a winning 1956 season for Linfield Football and started ‘The Streak.’ Each subsequent season has had a game in which a winning season was clinched allowing the streak -- national all-divisions record for consecutive winning record football seasons -- to continue. Linfield defense, led by Vic Fox and Howard Morris, held C of I’s conference-leading rusher to 31 yards on 11 carries. It was Linfield’s first win over C of I in six years. QB Ron Parrish “streaked 78 yards to one touchdown” and passed for two others,” said the Oregonian. The TDs were 75-yards to end Howard Glenn and 32 yards to halfback Bob Flood. PAT kicks respectively by Gary Wells and Gene Manley. Linfield head coach was Paul Durham.



1961: CAMELLIA BOWL IN SACRAMENTO

-Dec. 9, 1961, in Sacramento, California. Linfield lost 12-7 to Pittsburg (Kansas) State Gorillas, in the Camellia Bowl. This was the sixth annual NAIA championship football game. Linfield was the first team from the Northwest to compete for a NAIA football title. Played in the afternoon in Hughes Stadium on the Sacramento City College campus. The Wildcats were the first athletic team from Linfield to play for a national championship in any sport. About 10,000 (most of them Linfield fans) watched the game.

On its first play, a Gorilla player ran 64 yards for a TD. PAT kick failed. Linfield’s lone TD was on a six-yd. pass in the fourth quarter (4:08 to go) from Bill Parrish to Bernie Grant, followed by a Gary Olson PAT kick.

Linfield outgained Pittsburg State, 252 to 229 yards.

The game was telecast live on Portland’s KGW-TV and broadcast on McMinnville’s KMCM and Portland’s KGON radio.



1964: ‘CONCORDIA ICE BOWL’ IN NORTH DAKOTA

-Nov. 21, 1964, in Fargo, North Dakota. Linfield lost 28-6 to Concordia College (Moorhead, Minn.) Cobbers in an NAIA semi-final championship football playoff game known colloquially to Wildcat fans as the 'Concordia Ice Bowl.' Temperatures ranged from 10-15 degrees in the afternoon game played in Fargo (adjacent to Moorhead) on North Dakota State University’s Dacotah Field. Linfield scoring in the game came on a second quarter TD pass from QB Bill Mickle to Jerry Dressel. The PAT kick failed. Although he did not suit up for the game, future Linfield assistant and head football coach Ed Langsdorf, a sophomore, was a member of the 1964 Cobbers football team. Linfield head coach was Paul Durham.


-1965: WIN OVER SUL ROSS IN TEXAS
-1965: CHAMPION BOWL IN GEORGIA

In the NAIA 1965 football playoffs, Linfield, led by head coach Paul Durham, won in Texas and lost in Georgia:

-Nov. 27, 1965. Linfield beat Sul Ross State (Alpine, Texas) 30-27. Linfield’s most impressive win of the 1965 season was this night game played at Midland, Texas, Memorial Stadium. In an NAIA semifinal contest, Linfield’s Tim Kubli kicked a 36-yd. field goal – the longest field goal in NAIA playoff history to that point -- with 49 seconds left to break a tie at 27.

-Dec. 11, 1965: Linfield lost 33-0 to St. John’s (Minn.) University in the NAIA Champion Bowl. It was an afternoon game at ARC (Academy of Richmond County) Stadium in Augusta, Georgia, played before 4,873 fans. Linfield was held to 28 yards rushing and had four passes intercepted. St. John’s led 20-0 at halftime. It added 13 more points in the final quarter.

Linfield 1965 football team player Odis Avritt, an African American, said, “Several days prior to the team departing McMinnville for Augusta, following practice, I sought out coach Durham. Many questions were on my mind regarding going to the ‘Deep South’ and it seemed appropriate to share my concerns with him and get some answers to my apprehensions. My main question was, ‘Were we going to be separated as a team?’ ”

During times of overt racial discrimination, it was not uncommon for sports teams staying overnight on the road to have separate lodging, white players and coaches in a hotel and black players and coaches elsewhere.

“Realizing that the furthest East my travels had taken me was to St. Louis, Missouri, and Midland, Texas (for the Linfield vs. Sul Ross 1965 playoff football game), the idea of Georgia was beyond comprehension. Coach Durham assured me that the Linfield Wildcat football team would be together throughout the entire experience. Coach always had a way with words and you could trust his guidance. He said we would stay together as a team and we did,” Avritt said.

After the game, there was a racist incident prior to the NAIA postgame banquet (the NAIA Hall of Fame Banquet) which both teams attended in an Augusta convention center restaurant, part of the hotel in which both teams stayed.

As Linfield’s players, coaches and staff entered the hotel’s lobby en route to the banquet, Coach Durham was told by the restaurant manager that any colored people --for Linfield that meant African Americans and people of color from Hawaii -- with Linfield would have to eat in the restaurant’s kitchen. Coach Durham’s immediate response was, "Then we (the entire Linfield contingent) will all eat in the kitchen." When told there wasn't room in the kitchen for everyone from Linfield, he promptly stated "Then we won't eat." And, indeed, the Linfielders attending the banquet did not eat while all others at the banquet not affiliated with Linfield did.

Another 1965 Linfield football player, Bob Haack, said “There was no hesitation in Coach Durham’s response. He was a man of principles. He always did what he knew was right. His players were always a team and not a group of individuals. I have reflected many times over the years as to the lesson his action gave about racial equality to both teams as well as to the hotel employees.”

Avritt added, “What happened at the banquet was a testimony of the man Coach Durham was and his commitment to his players and team.”
..............
For Linfielders, Augusta, Georgia, means college football, not professional golf
http://wildcatville.blogspot.com/2017/08/for-linfielders-augusta-georgia-means.html
..............

 

1967: IN HONOLULU, UPSET OF UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII

-Sept. 23, 1967, in Honolulu, before 20,000, the largest crowd to ever see a Wildcat sporting event, Linfield upset favored University of Hawaii 15-13. The hot and rainy night game was played at old wooden Honolulu Stadium. A story about the game in a Honolulu daily newspaper said, “Hawaii gave it a good try, but the Rainbows were outgunned by the visitors from Oregon …”

Tim Kubli's three field goals; the passing of starting quarterback Mike Barrow, which included one TD pass; the running of Ed Griffin and the pass receptions of Rogers Ishizu were the big factors in the Linfield win said the Associated Press. Hawaii led 7-3 at halftime, but Linfield outscored the opponent 12-6 in the second half.

Before the game, Durham told a Honolulu daily newspaper sports editor, “I think Hawaii should be favored by 50 points.” Durham and his assistant coaches (Roy Helser and Ted Wilson) claimed to be “scared to death” about the Hawaii football team, “a rough, tough aggregation” which included eight transfers from Air Force Academy alone as well as other transfers from Nebraska, Southern Cal and Washington. But, Durham added, “We have a highly competitive team and I am sure we will make it a good game.”

Both Linfield and Hawaii “went into the (contest) with 11 players from Hawaii on each of their rosters. “Linfield started six players from Hawaii, more than Hawaii got into the game,” according to the Oregonian.

After the 1967 season, Durham retired as Linfield football coach and he picked Ad Rutschman, one of his former players, as his successor. Durham planned to stay at Linfield as athletic director and continue teaching. But, he was offered the University of Hawaii athletic director job and took it. There were several reasons Durham got the university job, one being the Wildcat football team win over Hawaii in Honolulu.

















1968: UPSET OF BOISE STATE IN BOISE

-Sept. 21, 1968, in Boise. Linfield’s Wildcats upset the Boise State College (now Boise State University) Broncos, 17-7. It was Ad Rutschman’s first game as Linfield head football coach and Boise State’s first game as a four-year school. The contest was played in 40-degree temperatures in the original (built in 1950) Bronco Stadium with wood grandstands on the east end of Boise State’s campus.

In the game, Linfield QB Len Gann threw a TD pass to Bob Murphy, and Jim Consbruck intercepted a Boise State pass and ran it 42 yards for a TD. Tim Kubli kicked two PATs and a field goal. Linfield led 14-0 at halftime.



1976, 1979, 1981: OREGON BOWL FOOTBALL GAMES OF NAIA DISTRICT 2

The Oregon Bowl featured the top Northwest Conference and Evergreen Conference finishers from NAIA District 2. Ad Rutschman was Linfield head coach in all three games.

OREGON BOWL I
-Nov. 20, 1976, in Monmouth at Oregon College of Education (OCE) Memorial Stadium. Linfield lost to OCE (now Western Oregon University), 49-28. Linfield scored the game's first 14 points, but OCE added 42 consecutive points before Linfield scored again. The game was tied at halftime, 14-14. Linfield TDs were on Jeff Owens’s two-yd. run in the (1st qtr) and Doug Nereu’s 15-yd. pass reception from Larry Doty (2nd qtr). Linfield concluded its scoring in the fourth quarter: Drake Conti 14-yd, pass from Dave Strain and Duffy Schneider 35-yd. pass from Pat Silva. Linfield’s Tom Sybouts kicked four PATs.

OREGON BOWL II
-Nov. 17, 1979, in McMinnville. Linfield lost to OCE (now WOU), 43-27. It was played before 1,000 fans rainy/muddy/sloppy conditions, OCE led 23-15 at halftime. With OCE leading 7-0, Linfield rebounded to take its only lead (9-7 10:24 1st qtr) after a safety and a 72-yd. run by Bruce Dinsmore. After that, Tom Sybouts kicked a PAT. With eight seconds left until halftime, Linfield scored on a 2-yd. pass from Alan Schmidlin to Leo Sloan (PAT kick failed). Linfield’s other scoring came on TDs in the third (Schmidlin 55-yd. run) and fourth (Pete Weymiller 40-yd. pass from Schmidlin) quarters. (PAT kicks failed.) Schmidlin set “several opponent postseason passing records, including 272 yards, 20 completions and 39 attempts. He totaled 351 yards of offense in the game,” said WOU Sports Info. In the regular season, the teams tied 35-35 on Oct. 6 in Monmouth.

OREGON BOWL III
-Thanksgiving, Nov. 26, 1981, in Klamath Falls. Linfield beat Oregon Tech (Oregon Institute of Technology), 10-7. Two inches of snow fell on the field the night before the afternoon game at Tech’s John F. Moehl Stadium. Oregon Tech scored with a TD and PAT in the first quarter with Linfield responding with a TD run by QB Jon Eagle and a PAT kick by Kyle Tarpening. In the third quarter, Tarpening kicked a 34-yd. field goal, said the Oregonian. Linfield has NAIA District 2’s top defense. It slowed down Tech’s high powered offense. It was Rutschman’s “100th collegiate triumph for Linfield … in 132 games over 14 seasons…,” reported the Nov. 27, 1981, Eugene Register-Guard.


1982, 1984, 1986: WINS IN THREE NAIA DIVISION II NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES

In 1982, 1984 and 1986, Linfield won three national football titles with Ad Rutschman as head coach. Because of muddy conditions at Linfield Maxwell Field, all the championship games were played at McMinnville High School’s Wortman Stadium. These titles joined the NAIA World Series championship won by the Rutschman-coached Linfield baseball team in 1971 and the 1966 NAIA World Series title by Linfield baseball coached by Roy Helser.

-Dec. 11, 1982, Linfield beat William Jewell (Mo.), 33-15.
It was Linfield’s first NAIA football title after championship title game losses in 1961 and 1965. The Wildcat defense was magnificent, recovering five William Jewell (Liberty, Missouri) fumbles and intercepting five of its passes. QB Randy Mueller (the game’s MVP) led the Linfield offense, completing 18 of 33 passes with no interceptions. Prior to the game -- played before almost 4,600 and a about 100,000 TV viewers -- Oregon Gov. Victor Atiyeh proclaimed Dec. 11 “Linfield College Football Day in Oregon.”

Linfield running back Tim Nacrelli “shrugged aside the pain from a compression fracture in his back and turned in one of the key plays of the game … a tackle-busting 30-yard run through heavy traffic” in the second quarter, said the Oregonian.

William Jewell scored seven points in the first quarter and eight in the last for its 15 points. Linfield scored TDs in the first on a 12 yd. pass from Mueller to Kent Bostick and a 12 yr. run by Dan Crowell. Kyle Tarpening had PAT kicks after each. In the third, Nacrelli scored a TD on a 32-yd. on pass from Mueller and Mike Freeman had a 1 yd. TD run. (Respective PAT run and pass failed.) In the last quarter was a 16 yd. pass from Mueller to Lance Lopes. (Tarpening PAT kick.)



-Dec. 8, 1984, Linfield beat Northwestern (Iowa), 33-22.
The win “probably was the greatest comeback in Linfield Football history,” said one game story. The Wildcats trailed defending NAIA-II champion Northwestern (Orange City, Iowa) 22-0 before a Linfield John Gray field goal at 3:02 in the third quarter. With 7:08 to go in the game, Linfield took the lead for the first time (26-22). Linfield QB David Lindley threw two TD passes and two passes for 2-point conversions. Two TD with two PAT kicks followed. In total 33 points in 15 and one-half minutes brought Linfield “back from the dead,” said the Oregonian.

The game’s most significant play, said the Oregonian, was when a pass from Northwestern’s quarterback was tipped by Linfield end Rich Moberg and intercepted by back Randy Heath at the Northwestern 32-yd. line. Linfield responded with a TD and a two point conversion to cut Northwestern’s lead to 22-11. That got the crowd of more than 3,600 back to life.

Linfield scoring in the game -- Third quarter: 27-yd. John Gray field goal. Keith Machida TD on one yard pass and a two-point PAT, both from Lindley. Fourth quarter: Greg Hodgkinson 37-yd. TD pass from Lindley and a Lindley to Randy Reason pass for a two-point PAT. Then, TD runs of eight and one yards respectively by Nacrelli and Mike Sigman, each followed by Gray PAT kicks.

-Dec. 13, 1986, Linfield beat Baker University (Baldwin City, Kansas), 17-0.
QB David Lindley directed Linfield to 355 net yards. Defense led by safety Damon Liles held Baker to 155 net yards. Both players from Albany, Ore.  It was the first shutout in a NAIA title game since 1978 and Linfield’s third NAIA football title in five years.


Almost 4,200 saw the game in which Baker was frustrated with its inability to run its option during the game, played in a cold, steady drizzle on a muddy field, said a UPI story. Added Rutschman, “We knew our defense had to play real well for us to win.” It did.

Baker lost four balls on fumbles. Linfield lost none.

In the game, Linfield had 21 first downs to Baker’s 10 and had a time of possession edge of more than 36 minutes to more than 23 minutes. Baker had 155 total yards and Linfield 200 more than that. Lindley was 21 of 37 in passing (no interceptions) for 207 yards.

Linfield scoring came in the first quarter from a 31-yd. field goal by Greg Gulliford and a two-yard TD run by Todd MacClanahan(PAT kick failed). In the fourth quarter, Andy Westernberg scored a TD on a one-yard run which was followed by a two-point PAT pass from Lindley to David Erickson.

Interesting to note: Baker’s starting tight end was Mike McCarthy, now head coach of the Green Bay Packers.

-Dec. 19, 1992, University of Findlay (Findlay, Ohio) beat Linfield, 26-13

In his first year as Linfield head football coach, Ed Langsdorf, guided the 1992 Wildcats to the NAIA DII national championship game. Prior to his four seasons (1992-1995) as Linfield head coach, Langsdorf was a Wildcats assistant football coach for 12 seasons. After he stepped down as head coach, he was an assistant four more seasons.

The afternoon game was played at Portland Civic Stadium before more than 9,000 fans.

Findlay’s defense overwhelmed Linfield, said the Oregonian. Findlay led 14-7 at halftime and outscored Linfield 12-6 in the second half.

Linfield, which averaged 476.5 yards of offense in its previous 12 games, was held to 268 yards by the Findlay defense, and managed only 204 yards after its opening march.

After the opening kickoff, Linfield used six plays to go 64 yards. QB Shannon Sells ran the final five yards after throwing a 25 yard pass to John Santiago and Gary McGarvie gained 19. Kunle Thomas kicked the PAT.

Linfield got a second touchdown on a 42-yard Sells-to-McGarvie pass play with 4:20 left in the game. A two post conversion after TD pass failed.


















2004: STAGG BOWL. WIN IN NCAA DIVISION III NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME

Jay Locey served 10 seasons (1996-2005) as Linfield head football coach after 13 seasons (1983–1995) as a Linfield assistant football coach. In 2004, his next to the last season as head coach, he led Linfield to its fourth national football championship and its first national team title as a member of the NCAA.

-Dec. 18, 2004, in Salem, Virginia. Linfield beat University of Mary Hardin Baylor (Belton, Texas), 28-21. It was the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl at Salem Stadium in Salem, Va. Attendance was 3,240. Temperature at the 11 o’clock in the morning Eastern time kickoff was 33 degrees.

Linfield QB Brett Elliott threw for two touchdowns and ran for another. Teammate Riley Jenkins ran for a team-high 81 yards on 18 carries and had four catches for 64 yards. Garrett Wales kicked four Linfield PATs.

Initial scoring was on a 39-yd. first quarter pass from Elliott to Brandon Hazenberg. In the same quarter, UHMB responded to tie the game at 7. Jenkins ran 14 yards for a TD in the second quarter in which UMHB responded with a TD of its own, but Linfield’s Ryan Caffall blocked the PAT attempt giving Linfield a 14-13 halftime lead. Elliott ran one yard for a TD at the end of the third quarter. UMHB scored on a TD run and a two point conversion at 9:01 in the fourth quarter to tie the game at 21. With 5:51 to go in the game, Elliott’s 10-yd. pass to Jenkins was the game’s final TD. Adding Wales’ PAT kick after it, gave Linfield a 28-21 lead it never relinquished. However, in the game’s closing seconds, UMHB had the ball on a fourth down with four yards to go on the Linfield 19. But, the UMHB quarterback was sacked by Linfield’s Kelle Bertrand and Brandon Tom on the 22 yard line. Linfield took over and ran out the clock.


POSTSCRIPT

PINE BOWL –Linfield first played Whitworth in football in 1952. The first time the teams played on Whitworth’s Pine Bowl football field in Spokane was Saturday afternoon, Sept. 19, 1953. Linfield lost, 20-0. While the Pine Bowl is not a bowl game, it is a bowl venue in which Linfield has played and plays Whitworth.
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Slideshow music: "The Thunderer" march by John Philip Sousa, performed by United States Marine Band.



For assistance with images and information thanks to:
  • Astoria Public Library
  • Bob and Nancy Steinbach Haack
  • Boise State University Special Collections & Archives
  • Concordia College Digital Collections
  • George Fox University Archives
  • George Murdock
  • Linfield College Handbook for Administrators
  • Linfield histories “Bricks Without Straw” by Jonas Jonasson (1938); “Linfield’s Hundred Years,” edited by Kenneth Holmes (1956); and “Inspired Pragmatism: An Illustrated History of Linfield College” by Marvin Henberg and Barbara Seidman (2007).
  • Linfield Magazine
  • Linfield Review
  • Linfield Sports Information
  • Linfield website
  • McMinnville Telephone-Register and News-Register
  • Odis Avritt
  • Portland Oregonian
  • Western Oregon University Sports Information

Note: Every effort has been made to assure accuracy of this posting. However, if you note errors, including omissions, please contact wildcatville@gmail.com

Friday, August 11, 2017

Why ‘Juice’ is nickname of Al Wills, Linfield Athletics Hall of Famer
















Story ("You may know Al Wills...") below was posted Aug. 11, 2017.

Al Wills died Aug. 12, 2017, in Honolulu.

John Prutsman told Wildcatville …


“After reading the earlier report about Juice Wills, I decided to write him a letter of appreciation. I typed out his name and address and before I could even start the letter, I got your report that he had died. I guess the message I would pass on to others is: If someone has had a meaningful part in your life, don’t wait to tell them. Let them know now; you may never get another chance.”


 … John lives in Portland. He played Linfield Wildcat football four seasons, 1953-1956

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You may know Al Wills was the first athlete from Hawaii to attend Linfield. And, you may know Al is a member of the Linfield Athletics Hall of Fame.

But, why is “Juice” his nickname?

Al (Linfield Class of 1952, graduated in 1956) lettered playing football for Linfield in the 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1952 seasons.

Wildcatville asked Hall of Famer Ray Olson (football letters 1951, 1952 and 1953) why “Juice?”

Ray didn’t know. But, he asked Pat Smith (football letters 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1952).

According to Pat, as told to Ray, “In 1949, when Al came to Linfield, first they called him Pine-apple. Then, he was called Pine-Apple Juice which eventually became “Juice,” which he liked.”
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=Text about Linfield Athletics Hall of Fame "Class of 2004" members says Al was a member of Linfield Class of 1956
http://www.linfield.edu/sports/hof-main.html?y=12
"Al Wills '56, the first student-athlete to attend Linfield from the state of Hawaii, said Linfield "will always be my family. The college provided me with a great foundation for success." Wills, an All-American offensive and defensive lineman, was known as a great downfield blocker and outstanding team leader."


=Al's bio for Linfield Athletics Hall of Fame, says Al graduated from Linfield in 1953.
"Following graduation from Linfield in 1953 ..."

See below. Al was a member of Class of 1953, but graduated in 1956.

Al (Linfield Class of 1953) lettered playing Linfield football in the 1949-1950-1951 and 1952 seasons. He served two years (1953 and 1954) in the U.S. Army. Then, returned to Linfield in 1954 and attended the college 1954-1955 and 1955-1956, earning his degree in 1956. So, he was a member of the Class of 1953, but graduated in 1956.

During the 1955 and 1956 football seasons he was Linfield football line coach.

He moved from Lifnield to eastern Oregon/Union County and taught and coached at Elgin, Ore., High School -- Elgin is near La Grande -- starting in the fall of 1956. He taught and coached football and track there. He became Elgin's head football coach in the 1957 seasons and also led the Elgin football program in 1958.

He resigned his job at Elgin High School summer of 1959 to go join his alma mater, St. Louis High School in Honolulu, as athletic director and teacher. In 1960 he continued those two roles and also became head football coach at St. Louis.

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 Al Wills, Linfield athlete 1949-1952

Member Linfield Athletics Hall of fame, joined 2004

Four-year football letterwinner Al "Juice" Wills was respected by his teammates for his leadership, hard hits, unselfish play.

He was the first athlete to attend Linfield from the state of Hawaii, coming on the recommendation of Dustin "Dusty" Woods, an uncle who worked at Linfield and was familiar with the athletics program.

Wills started all four years as a tackle on both offense and defense, earning all-conference recognition three straight seasons. He was a lead blocker on the sweep for All-American and Linfield Hall of Fame inductee Ad Rutschman. Despite modest size, he earned a reputation as the best downfield blocker in the Northwest Conference. He was equally fierce on defense, and against Willamette his senior year, he collided with a blocker so hard that the force of the blow knocked down the ball carrier in his tracks.

Following graduation from Linfield in 1953, Wills spent two years with the U.S. Army in his hometown of Honolulu, Hawaii. He was a starter on the Army's football team that competed in the University of Hawaii's Armed Forces Conference.

He returned to Linfield to work two seasons on the staff of Wildcats coach Paul Durham. Wills tutored All-Americans Vic Fox and Howard Morris, and was a member of the coaching staff of the 1956 team that began Linfield's fabled consecutive winning seasons streak.

A health and physical education major at Linfield, Wills began a teaching and coaching career in Oregon at Elgin High School in the eastern part of the state/Union County near La Grande.

He later returned to the islands, where he served as teacher, coach and athletic director at St. Louis, Radford and Kalani high schools. In 1991, he was honored with the state award of merit from the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association. Six years later, he was singled out for an outstanding service award by the Hawaii Interscholastic Athletic Directors Association, and received the Oahu Interscholastic League award of merit.
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Sunday Jan. 30, 1966, Honolulu Star-Bulletin & Advertiser

Succeeds Ching as Grid Mentor

Wills Named Kalani Coach

By Monte Ito

Albert (Al) Wills, former St. Louis High School mentor, has been appointed head football coach at Kalani High School.

His appointment was announced yesterday by Francis Oliveria, Kalani principal.

Wills succeeds Wilfred Ching, Kalani coach the past four seasons, and will assume his duties at the start of the 1966-67 school term in September. Wills is presently acting vice principal at Radford High School.

“I am very happy to return to coaching,” Wills said yesterday after meeting with Oliveria.

Wills coached at St. Louis in 1960 and 1961 and was the school’s first lay athletic director from 1959 until June, 1962.

“We are very fortunate in having a teacher of Mr. Wills’ ability as our new coach,” Oliveria stated.

Oliveria, who became principal at Kalani last September, also praised Ching for the fine work he did with the Falcons the past four seasons. Ching is on the physical education staff of Kalani.

Oliveria said Wills will join Kalani’s faculty in the fall in addition to becoming football coach.

Shortly after his appointment, Wills announced that one of his assistants will be Dick Miyata, a former guard who was on Wills’ staff at St. Louis. Miyata is an experienced line coach and is expected to serve in this capacity.

Wills is a St. Louis High School graduate, class of ’49, and played guard under Neil Blaisdell, now mayor of Honolulu. He was on the Linfield (Ore.) College varsity for three years as a tackle. He majored in math at Linfield where he received his B.A. degree.

He taught at Elgin High School in eastern Oregon for three years and coached the football team for two seasons.

Wills is only the third football coach at Kalani since the Falcons entered Interscholastic League of Honolulu varsity completion. Ed Kawawaki preceded Ching.





















PHOTOS

--Head coach Kalani High School, Sunday Jan. 30, 1966, Honolulu Star-Bulletin & Advertiser (White shirt)

--Assistant coach, Linfield Football 1956, Linfield Oak Leaves 1957 (aloha shirt)

--Player for Linfield Football, various Linfield Oak Leaves yearbooks

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Al Wills taught at Elgin High School appx. 1957-1959 and was Elgin’s head football coach appx. 1957 and 1958 seasons. “Coaches’ Profile” (below) from Sept. 23 1960 edition of Honolulu Star-Bulletin:






















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Below from Nov. 5, 1949, Oregon Statesman, Salem:
















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Nov 18 1952 Oregonian





































Nov 19 1972 Sunday Honolulu Star-Bulletin & Advertiser