Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Kevin Kyle Mosley, Wildcat




Linfield grad dies in Tokyo crash
Published March 25, 2009, with supplemental information added April 2009 by Wildcatville.
Before a 2010 Linfield-Lewis & Clark softball game, family and friends of Kevin Mosley gathered for the blessing of the batting cages to celebrate what would have been his 55th birthday. Read more here.

By STARLA POINTER
Of the McMinnville, Ore., News-Register
Kevin Mosley, a 1977 Linfield College graduate, died Monday when the cargo plane he was piloting crashed and burned on the runway at Tokyo International Airport.

The veteran Federal Express pilot was one of two victims. His co-pilot, the only other person on the plane, also perished.

The crash occurred as Mosley was attempting to land an MD-11, an expanded version of McDonnell Douglas' DC-10 transcontinental passenger plane. He and his co-pilot had taken off from FedEx's main air hub in China.

A Hillsboro High School graduate, Mosley, 54, attended Linfield from fall 1973 through his graduation in 1977 with a degree in physical education.

He pitched all four years for the Wildcat baseball team. The Linfield football media guide shows that he also lettered in football in 1974, his sophomore year.

Mosley and his wife, Marissa, a 2000 Linfield continuing education graduate, were living in his hometown of Hillsboro at the time of his death. They have two adult daughters and a granddaughter.

McMinnville's Ad Rutschman, who coached Mosley, a pitcher, on the varsity baseball team for four years, heard the news when he was in Hood River with the McMinnville High School girls' softball team.

"Kevin bought me a pair of binoculars back when he was flying in the Marines. He got them in Hong Kong or somewhere overseas," Rutschman recalled. "I was using the binoculars, looking out the hotel window in Hood River, when the news came on TV."

Rutschman remembered the former Wildcat as a very nice person. Mosley had been flying since was in high school, he said, and he joined the military after college to learn to pilot big planes.
"He had so much experience flying," Rutschman said. "He landed on aircraft carriers! The wind must have been a factor in the crash."

That's what investigators are saying, as well.

Officials said preliminary investigation shows a weather-related phenomenon known as wind shear may have caused the wide-body cargo carrier to flip and crash.

Federal Express owns the largest fleet of MD-11s in the world. According to aviation sources, several MD-11s have flipped in like fashion while attempting to land.

Mosley’s brother, Shawn Mosley, Linfield Class of 1970, also played baseball and football for Ad Rutschman at Linfield. And, Shawn played the same sports for the same coach at Hillsboro High School, too.

:::::::::
Flying was life for Hillsboro pilot who died in FedEx crash

Posted by Wendy Owen
The Oregonian March 23, 2009

Kevin Mosley got his pilot's license when he was 16 years old and flew his Hillsboro High School friends in a rented Piper Cub to see the ocean.

He landed fighter jets on an aircraft carrier in the open seas, flew passenger jets for Horizon and, finally, cargo jets for FedEx.
Mosley, 54, died Monday as he attempted to land a FedEx jet at Tokyo's main international airport. His co-pilot, Anthony Stephen Pino, 49, of San Antonio was also killed.
Investigators believe a sudden gust of wind or "wind shear" may have been a factor. Footage from security cameras at Narita Airport showed the plane touch down and bounce before it flipped on its side and over.
Mosley had found his niche flying cargo jets for FedEx for the past decade. He preferred them to ferrying passengers, said his friend Tom Jones of Hillsboro.
"It always scared him to fly with people because what if something happened," Jones said. "That's why his dream was to fly cargo."
Jones said he remembers Mosley's schedule took him on an 11-day route from Alaska to Asia.
Then he got to spend time with his wife, Marissa, two grown daughters and a granddaughter.
His mother, Patricia Fullenwider, said her son was devoted to them and made sure he called his wife whenever he traveled. She said Mosley spoke with his wife Sunday morning before his scheduled takeoff.

"He was outstanding," said Fullenwider, 81. "They adored him and he adored them. He called his wife every night and he called me a couple of times a week. He did everything for me that he could possibly do."
Mosley played baseball and football at Hillsboro High School, graduating in 1973. He later played baseball at Linfield College before joining the Marines.
Mike McCallen was his catcher on the high school baseball team, where Mosley was known for his fastball.
"He'd take us flying," McCallen said. In the 1970s, it didn't cost much to rent a plane at the Hillsboro Airport. "We'd fly over our houses and stuff."

Mosley's friends used to tease him about being so serious when he flew them around, but he had good reason.

"That was going to be his life," Jones said. "When I heard this morning ... knowing Kevin, he probably used every ounce of energy trying to keep that plane straight."

Jones said he last saw Mosley about a year ago. They got together with a few other guys to play poker, and Jones planned to call him with an invitation to the next game. Mosley usually won.

"He was an outgoing guy, full of energy," Jones said. "He just enjoyed life."
Unusually strong gusts of about 47 mph were blowing through Narita city around the time of the crash, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency.

But Kazuhito Tanakajima, an aviation safety official at the Transport Ministry, said the wind speed at the time of the accident was not enough to be considered dangerous, unless wind shear was involved. He said there was a head wind of about 45 mph, and a crosswind of about 7 mph.
FedEx said it was investigating the cause of the accident.
"We will continue to work closely with the applicable authorities as we seek to determine the cause for this tragic incident," it said in a statement.
Noelle Crombie of The Oregonian staff and The Associated Press contributed to this report.
……
http://www.linfield.edu/sports/release.php?id=2892
Ex-Wildcat dies in fiery plane crashMarch 24, 2009 from Linfield Sports Information

Former Linfield baseball and football player Kevin Mosley, 54, died Monday as he attempted to land a FedEx jet at Tokyo's main international airport.

His co-pilot, Anthony Stephen Pino, 49, of San Antonio was also killed.
Mosley got his pilot's license when he was 16 years old and flew his Hillsboro High School friends in a rented Piper Cub to see the ocean.
He landed fighter jets on an aircraft carrier in the open seas, flew passenger jets for Horizon and, finally, cargo jets for FedEx.
Investigators believe a sudden gust of wind or "wind shear" may have been a factor. Footage from security cameras at Narita Airport showed the plane touch down and bounce before it flipped on its side and over.
Mosley had found his niche flying cargo jets for FedEx for the past decade. He preferred them to ferrying passengers, said his friend Tom Jones of Hillsboro.
"It always scared him to fly with people because what if something happened," Jones said.
"That's why his dream was to fly cargo." Jones said he remembers Mosley's schedule took him on an 11-day route from Alaska to Asia. Then he got to spend time with his wife, Marissa, two grown daughters and a granddaughter.
His mother, Patricia Fullenwider, said her son was devoted to them and made sure he called his wife whenever he traveled. She said Mosley spoke with his wife Sunday morning before his scheduled takeoff.
"He was outstanding," said Fullenwider, 81. "They adored him and he adored them. He called his wife every night and he called me a couple of times a week. He did everything for me that he could possibly do."

Mosley played baseball and football at Hillsboro High School, graduating in 1973. He later played baseball and football at Linfield, graduating in 1977, before joining the Marines.

He lettered four times in baseball as a pitcher, posting a 10-7 win-loss record and a 2.94 earned run average. He ranks sixth in the Linfield career record book for games finished (17) and is tied for 16th for most complete games (10). He also lettered in football in 1974 as a defensive back.

Mosley's friends used to tease him about being so serious when he flew them around, but he had good reason. "That was going to be his life," Jones said. "When I heard this morning ... knowing Kevin, he probably used every ounce of energy trying to keep that plane straight."
Jones said he last saw Mosley about a year ago. They got together with a few other guys to play poker, and Jones planned to call him with an invitation to the next game. Mosley usually won.
"He was an outgoing guy, full of energy," Jones said. "He just enjoyed life."

FedEx said it is investigating the cause of the accident.

……………
http://www.linfield.edu/sports/release.php?id=2896

Message from the Kevin Mosley family, March 26, 2009 via Linfield Sports Information

Dear Linfield Family, Our family would like to express our sincere gratitude for the wonderful outpouring of love and support during this tragedy. We cannot thank everyone enough for all of the flowers, plants, food, visits, phone calls, e-Mails, blogs, cards, heartfelt letters and the many other expressions of support.

….

He was a member of Theta Chi fraternity and took part in Wildcat Open golf tournaments, Linfield's top athletic-related fund-raising event.
..........
Heartfelt thank you from Marissa Mosley
Those who made a memorial donation in Kevin’s memory received a heartfelt thank you card dated May 20, 2010, from his widow, Marissa Mosley. She said his support of the Wildcats continued throughout his life, “So I wanted a lasting memorial for him and leave a legacy for Linfield athletics at the same time.

“With the help of family and friends, the Linfield Wildcats softball batting cage facility was built in honor of Kevin. Even though Kevin was more closely tied to football and baseball, I ultimately decided that the softball batting cages would be a proper tribute.

“Kevin … played softball the first year after we married. Shawn (Kevin’s brother) started the softball program at Dallas High in Oregon where he taught and coached until he retired.

“Stephanie (Kevin’s niece) participated in the Linfield softball program. Kevin taught Karissa (our granddaughter) how to hit softballs and play catch. So I was so proud that she played this year for her high school softball team quite fittingly also called the Wildcats and did very well.

“Not to be outdone, Megan (Kevin’s grandniece) though only 6, also plays softball. So, there is certainly a family tradition of softball.

“The Linfield Wildcats softball batting cages were officially dedicated” March 7, 2010 “which would have been Kevin’s 55th birthday. The softball team played two games after the dedication. It was evident that they were truly impacted by the gift” – it “went on to win both games by a large margin!

“In addition to giving the team a competitive edge, these batting cakes will stand as a lasting tribute to Kevin now and for many years to come.

“In fact, it looked they are already doing wonders for the program – the team won the NCAA Division III Regional Championship in Eau Claire, Wisconsin,” May 24, 2010. “They entered the playoffs ranked Nov. 1 in the National Fast Pitch Coaches Association poll with a record for fewest losses in one season and had set a new standing for best winning percentage.”

Kevin Kyle Mosely
Linfield College

Kevin was a member of Linfield’s class of 1977. He was very involved in Linfield Athletics, majoring in physical education and lettering in both football and baseball. He was awarded the most inspirational player for the baseball team. He lettered 4 times in baseball as a pitcher, posting a 10-7 win-loss record and a 2.94 earned run average. He ranks 6th in the Linfield career record book for games finished (17) and is tied for 16th for most complete games (10). He also lettered in football in 1974 as a defensive back.

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Seattleness/Weather

Pacific Magazine Seattle Times Oct. 2, 1988

GALLERY
Title: "Seattleness"
Theme: Weather

Friday, April 17, 2009

What was the named telephone prefix where you live(d)?

In Wildcatville, before the phone numbers became all numbers, the named prefix was WIldcat.

A Linfield grad, who grew up in Lakewood (Pierce County), Wash., remembers the prefix when he moved to Lakewood was LAkewood. Later, to his disappointment, LAkewood was dropped and replaced with JUniper. That made no sense. While the Lakewood prefix had a connection to Lakewood, Juniper (the tree) had no known connection to Lakewood. The prefix might as well have been JUpiter (the planet).

This brings us to McMinnville, Ore., the home of Linfield College. What was the named prefix in McMinnville before “Mac” went to the 472 prefix?

The answer, thanks to Linfield alum Gordon Gillmouth, is that there was none! That’s correct, when Mac went to 472 it replaced calling the operator and asking to be connected to a phone number.

One correspondent told Gillmouth, “When we moved to McMinnville in 1944 our first telephone number was 560J which was later changed to 5602. There was no prefix. When making a call you had to go through the operator. The 472 prefix came about when we got dial service. I am not sure when this happened but maybe about 1960?" This information, with different recollections, has been confirmed by others Gillmouth has contacted on behalf of Wildcatville.

So, even though McMinnville did not have named telephone prefixes, it does not prevent providing named prefixes, as if they existed. So, here are some:

DUurham - As in Coach Paul Durham
EVergreen – See Wine, need time machine to know Evergreen's Mac impact
FIlbert - Chosen instead of HAzelnut
GRizzlies - McMinnville High mascot
HAwaii -- Honoring Linfield's Hawaii connections. Tough choice. Could have been HArtford, honoring the "Hartford Connection"

JAane Claire Dirks-Edmunds - Long-time prof
LInfield - Famous college in McMinnville
MAc - Nickname for McMinnville
MCminnville - Name of McMinnville
OLdOak - Linfield's tree of fame

PIoneer - A Linfield hall
RAindrops - Rain falls in McMinnville
ROcket - As in the Rocket Cafe
RUtschman - Famous Linfield athlete and coach

TUrkey - McMinnville is home of Turkeyrama
UFO - Think flying saucer and 1950
WAlnut - McMinnville has been called Walnut City
WIne - This would work only if people hopped in time machine and saw how wine has flooded the Yamhill Valley
YAmhill - Name of county in which McMinnville is located

Others? Tell Wildcatville by e-mailing wildcatville@gmail.com

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Probably from the Linfield Bookstore

All three of these were probably bought at the Linfield Bookstore by a Linfield 1970 grad while the grad attended Linfield, 1966-1970.The post card has not date, but notice in the upper right hand corner the college's baseball field at its old location before it was moved closer to Maxwell Field. The button shows an interesting version of the Wildcat. The decal is more familiar. A slight variation of it appears on the Linfield football team helmets.






Linfield folders of the past

Two plastic-coated folders purchased in the Linfield Bookstore. On the topt, probably bought during the 1966-67 school year. On the bottom -- probably from between 1967-70 – is marked as selling for 39 cents. No price on the older folder.









1983 Linfield Varsity-Alumni football game


Flyer promoting the 1983 Linfield varsity-alumni football game. Coming off an NAIA national football title in 1982, the varsity lost to the alumni, 19-17, Sept. 10, 1983 on Maxwell Field. Carl Heisler coordinated the alumni team which was (sort of) coached by Paul Durham. One of Durham's former Linfield players, Ad Rutschman, coached the varsity. In the 1983 season, Linfield varsity had a 6-2-1 record.

Son of Linfield president was Linfield golf coach

Coach John F. Dillin (third from the left) poses with 1970 Linfield Golf Team members (left to right) Kent Scott, Mike Conklin, Dave Greig, Charlie Woods, Lance Madenwald and Steve Miyasaka. Photo -- taken by Tim Marsh at the Bayou Golf Course outside of McMinnville – appeared in the 1970 Oak Leaves. By the way, according to its Website, the Bayou was established in 1964.



Question- What son of a Linfield president served as a coach for the Wildcats?

Answer –The
late John F. Dillin, a 1961 Linfield graduate and a son of Linfield President (1943-1968) Harry Dillin and Irene Dillin, a 1939 graduate of the college.

During his career, John served more than a decade as golf coach and director of the Linfield Bookstore.

Speaking of Wildcat sports, Harry was also a Linfield coach. While serving as a professor at the college, before he became president, Harry coached tennis.



This Linfield Department of Athletics letterhead shows John's name as golf coach. Also listed are Paul Durham, athletic director and football coach; Hal Smith, men's track and wrestling coach; Roy Helser, baseball coach, and Ted Wilson, men's basketball coach.





Saturday, April 04, 2009

Resurrected from the cutting room floor



"Left on the cutting room floor" is a popular expression when talking about the production of motion pictures. A lot of film is shot for a movie, but not all of it will end up on the screen. Thus, what is not seen in the movie is "left on the cutting room floor."

While Linfield's Oak Leaves student yearbook is (or was, if it no longer exists) not a motion picture, not every photo taken or considered for the yearbook ended/ends up in print.

The two photos here are examples. These are from a 1969 cross-country meet (opponents included PLU and Pacific) on the Pacific University campus in Forest Grove, Ore. The photos were going to appear in the 1970 Oak Leaves, but, alas they were "left on the cutting room floor."

Speaking of the 1970 Oak Leaves, read a tale about a photo which DID appear in the yearbook here.








Friday, April 03, 2009

Wildcat sign would solve Portland controversy

April 3, 2009

Wildcatville offers the signage below as a compromise for the current controversy concerning Portland’s “Made in Oregon” sign. If you are not familiar with the controversy, see this March 31, 2009, Portland Tribune story.

Wilcatville's compromise sign:
The sign the way it is:
Sign proposed by Randy Leonard, Portland city commissioner:

Recipes from Wildcatville Kitchen


Thanks to the chef, recipes from Wildcatville Kitchen.

Sour Cream Sauce for baked potatoes via the Sacajawea Hotel in
La Grande, Ore., on 11/20/1967. Mix:

1 cup sour cream
1 cup mayonnaise
½ teaspoon seasoning salt
½ teaspoon pepper
¼ teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons vinegar


Hot Dog Hot Sauce via unknown on unknown date. Can be prepared ahead of time and reheated. Mix:

1 tablespoon instant minced onion (optional)
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons vinegar
¼ cup chili sauce
½ cup ketchup
¾ cup water and bring to boil.
Add 12 frankfurters, quartered
Simmer 20 minutes
Pack in wide-necked Thermos bottle
Service on Italian rolls, split
Serves 6

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Linfield doesn’t have the only Melrose Hall


Melrose Halls at Linfield, Redlands (l-r, top row) and William Jewell Colleges.
Just as there’s more than one Linfield, there are Melrose Halls on other college campuses.

The Linfield Website gives background about the college’s Melrose Hall, Linfield’s main administration building. Melrose opened in 1929. It was built for $220,000, “made possible by donation from M.C. Treat. Melrose Hall takes its name from a monastery in Scotland, which was a favorite of Treat's” There are Melrose Halls on the campuses of the University of Redlands in Californian and William Jewell College in Missouri “also made possible by donations from Treat.”

Both student residence halls, Redland’s Melrose and Jewell’s Melrose opened in 1924 and 1927 respectively.

Oh, there’s a Linfield Hall at Wayland College (Academy?) in Wisconsin. See postcard image above.

Questions?

  • Show me a photo of Scotland's Melrose Abbey a.k.a. monastery. Click on the link.
  • Who was M.C. Treat? See below.
M. C. TREAT, 85, DEAD;
OIL AND GAS OPERATOR;

Gave Baptist Causes Several
Millions -- Helped Hundreds of Students.

Special to The New York Times. Monday Dec. 21, 1925

WASHINGTON, Pa., Dec. 20 – M.C. Treat, 85 years old, one of the nation’s foremost oil and gas operators, who had given several millions to the Baptist denomination, died yesterday at his home in Pasadena, Cal., where he had resided for ten years.

He began his career in Western Pennsylvania nearly half a century ago. His interest when he died included holdings in companies operating in various parts of the United States, Mexico and South America. He was one of the organizers of the Ohio Fuel Corporation, the Lone Star, the Penn-Mex and many other enterprises.

Mr. Treat was born in Emlenton, Pa., and lived there for twenty years. Previously, he had been active in Bradford, Pa. He was one of the largest stockholders of the Washington Trust Company of this city. For many years he paid the expenses of sixty young men at years in various Baptist educational institutions, a majority of whom were studying for the ministry. Besides helping Baptist colleges and universities, Mr. Treat helped build a college for young women in Che Foo, China; a school for young men and women in Cuba and three Baptist churches in this city.

Pullman Education Foundation sets two April 2009 fund-raising events


April 2, 2009

Pullman, Wash. – Two Pullman Education Foundation fund-raising events at Lincoln Middle School have been set for April 2009.

On Wednesday, April 15, from 6:30-8:30 p.m., a musical instrument
replacement dessert takes place.

On Saturday, April 18, the annual Booked for Brunch will be 7-11 a.m.

Tickets for the April 15 dessert are $5 each. Foundation board member and other volunteers will serve desserts donated by parents of middle school and Pullman High School music students.

Musical groups will perform. Funds raised help replace worn out musical instruments used by student musicians.

For the April 18 brunch, tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for children age 12 and younger. Brunch fare will include scrambled eggs, linked sausages, hash brown potatoes, fresh fruit salad, cinnamon streusel coffeecake, juice, coffee and tea. Children will have a chance to win books during the brunch, which supports Pullman school libraries.

Buy tickets for both events at the door. Brunch tickets are being sold now in Pullman at Chipman & Taylor Chevrolet, Bank of America, Neill’s Flowers & Gifts and from foundation board members.

Wednesday, April 01, 2009

Ken Williams, beloved Linfield Hall of Famer












Photos above from McEwen High School (Athena, Umatilla County, Ore.) yearbook. He was a member of the school's Class of 1951.





Ken Williams from News-Register and from April 17, 1966, Linews.
Same photo, with different cropping, appears in 1969 Oak Leaves


Kenneth Charles Williams
1933-2009


McMinnville, Ore., News-Register
Obituary 2776411. Posted appx. March 31, 2009

Memorial services for Kenneth Charles Williams of McMinnville will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, April 3, at Ted Wilson Gymnasium at Linfield College. The Rev. Bernard Turner will officiate.

Interment will be private. Macy & Son Funeral Directors of McMinnville is in charge of arrangements. Mr. Williams died Monday, March 30, 2009, at Willamette Valley Medical in McMinnville. He was 76.

Ken Williams was born Jan. 31, 1933, in Walla Walla, Wash., the son of Frank and Juanita Mae (Woodruff) Williams.

He grew up in Adams (Oregon, Umatilla County) and graduated from what is now Weston-McEwen High School in Athena, Ore. He completed his bachelor of science from Linfield in business in 1955. After graduation from Linfield, he entered the U.S. Air Force, spending four years on assignment in the United States and abroad. While stationed in Morocco, he worked as a disc jockey for the Armed Forces radio.

He returned to Linfield after being discharged from the military. For two years, he worked in the admissions’ office. Upon completing his master’s degree, he taught and counseled for two years at Sheridan High School. During this period, he began work toward his doctorate in counseling and guidance from the University of Wyoming.

He may hold some kind of record for job titles at Linfield. He has been called, among other things, an admissions counselor, professor, Dean of Men, Director of Student Teaching and Placement, Director of Upward Bound and Special Services, registrar, Alumni Affairs Director, Assistant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, Interim Vice President, Director of the Portland Campus and advisor to foreign students. Some of the assignments he held at the same time.

He loved spending time with his family and grandchildren, enjoyed retirement parties, roasting Linfield friends, camping, visiting with friends and Linfield sports.

Survivors include his wife, Gail of McMinnville; three sons, Ken Williams Jr. of Newburyport, Mass., Gregg Williams of Portland and Brent Williams of Ardmore, Penn.; a daughter, Brenda Westfall of Olympia, Wash.; a sister, Jeanne Cothrell of McMinnville and six grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be made to Linfield Top Cat Club, care of Macy & Son Funeral Directors, 135 N.E. Evans St., McMinnville, OR 97128.

To leave online condolences, visit http://www.macyandson.com/.

This is a story from the Sunday Oregonian, Nov. 8, 1953. Ken Williams fondly remembered this game played Nov. 7 in Newberg, Ore., because he played for the Linfield JV football team. He and a friend each paid $1 to attend the game. Linfield had few players. At halftime Ken suited up and played the entire second half for the victorious Wildcats. "It was my best game in a Wildcat uniform," Ken said.
.......................

Editor’s Note
Ken Williams, a graduate of Weston-McEwen High School, was a member of the Linfield faculty from 1970 through 1998. In 2001, he was inducted into the Linfield Athletics Hall of Fame. He died Monday, March 30.

Weston-McEwen grad made his mark with Linfield athletics

By Tim Marsh
for The East Oregonian,
Pendleton, Ore. Tuesday, March 31, 2009


For 26 years, until 1998, Ken Williams '55, was Linfield's faculty athletic representative (FAR).

In a nutshell, he was responsible for accumulating information on each student intending to compete in an intercollegiate sport.

Ken Williams' work as FAR was far from the Wildcat sports spotlight. For example, he filed eligibility reports with every conference college or university and the district office. He worked on athletic eligibility of transfer students and on hardship cases. He collected data, analyzed it and produced reports. He attended practice sessions and games and matches. And more.

Ken says, "hardly a day would go by without some involvement by me" as faculty athletic rep. But, it had to be done and he did it well. Without extra pay and no work load credit.D

uring his tenure, he served four times as president of the Northwest Conference Faculty Athletic Representatives. Under his leadership, the conference dealt with a variety of issues including The College of Idaho leaving the NWC, Whitman College dropping football, women's athletics being added, financial aid standards, and the initial work of leaving the NAIA and joining the NCAA.

FAR duty took him off campus. The common schedule for the representatives was to meet the weekend before Thanksgiving and on Mother's Day.

His wife, Gail Williams, Linfield Class of 1958, says Ken attended to FAR duties "before work, after work and on weekends because there was not enough time during his hours as the college's registrar."

His efforts have been recognized over the years. In 1984, former Linfield President Charles U. Walker praised Ken's coordination of the Wildcat's three home games in the 1984 NAIA national football playoffs. Linfield won the title. For the skill shown by Linfield in playing host to football playoff games, NAIA officials complimented him.NAIA District 2 Meritorious Service and Linfield Alumni Service awards also recognize his skill and commitment to intercollegiate athletics and the college.

Ken's connection to the college started in 1951, when he came to Linfield as a freshman student from Weston-McEwen High School in Athena.

He graduated from Linfield in 1955 (B.S. business administration) and earned a master of education degree in 1962. He earned an education doctoral degree from the University of Wyoming through the competitive selection National Defense Education Act Institute and also took part in a year-long NDEA program at Michigan State University.

He worked for Linfield for a total of 34 years, starting in 1959 and ending with retirement in 1997. They were not consecutive years. During that time he spent some four years in public school education.

His jobs at the college have included being registrar, assistant to vice president for academic affairs and dean as well as acting academic affairs dean, interim academic affairs vice president and dean. He sas also alumni affairs director, Upward Bound director, special services director and Portland campus director.

While much is known about Ken's work for the college, less is known about his experience as a Linfield student athlete. He earned three letters in track (high jump, discus), played freshman basketball and a year of football.

Speaking of football, in a home game on Maxwell Field, Linfield was easily winning in the waning moments. He had not played. But, then Coach Paul Durham sent him in as a defensive end. Three-quarters of the way to the huddle a teammate, also from the sidelines, came up behind him and said, "Williams, I'm in for you." He did play a down in that game. And, he did play for the Linfield football JVs when they beat the George Fox varsity in that university's homecoming football game in Newberg. He and a friend each paid $1 to attend the game as fans. At halftime, because Linfield had few players, they found equipment, suited up and played the entire second half. Ken said modestly, "It was my best game in a Wildcat uniform."

In retirement, Ken enjoys attending Linfield athletic contests. He cheers on Wildcat players and teams. He had good training. As a Linfield student, he was a charter member of Linfield infamous "South Forty" basketball cheering section.Williams kept attending Wildcat games because, as his wife, Gail, says, "for the love of Linfield, Wildcat athletics and all of those involved."

............................


Retired Linfield Registrar Ken Williams
is honored Friday in Melrose Hall, where
the college renamed the registrar's office
for him. Chrissy Ragulsky/News-Register

Leaving a Linfield legacy
Published: April 10, 2004 . With additional information and a photo added by Wildcatville in April 2009.

By STARLA POINTER
Of the McMinnville, Ore., News-Register

Most people at Linfield, and many in the rest of McMinnville, know Ken Williams, who spent more than four decades at the college before retiring six years ago. But Jeanne Cothrell has known him longer than anyone else - since he was born, in fact.

"He was just a cute little devil, full of vim and vigor," said Cothrell, Williams' older sister. "He was everybody's darling in our tiny town. He's still everybody's darling."

Williams, known for his sense of humor, describes himself as "a bad seed." But his wife, Gail, sees it differently.

"Ken's a beautiful person. He's such a sweet man, a gentle man, a kind and caring man," she said.
Although she admits she is a little biased, she isn't alone in her assessment. Linfield officials agree. So on Friday, they renamed the registrar's office in Melrose Hall in Williams' honor.

Williams said he always liked working with college students and his fellow staff members at Linfield. He was pleased to be able to talk with anyone on campus, from groundskeepers to the president.

"I always went all over campus. I tried to see people in their offices, their territory, rather than making them come to me," he said.

He chuckled. "That gave Norma and Phyllis fits about where I was," he said, referring fondly to former registrar's office staff members Norma Cochran and Phyllis Smith.

---

Williams and his sister grew up on a wheat and pea ranch halfway between Adams and Athena.

He was a good student and a multisport athlete, as was required in such a small school, he said.

He came to Linfield in 1951. A meticulous record keeper, he still has the letter from Paul Durham offering him a half-tuition scholarship - $200! - based on his academic and athletic record.

The summer after his sophomore year, he went home to help on the farm, as usual. He was plowing in the dust and heat when he suddenly wondered, "What am I doing out here?"
At that point, he said, he decided against a career in farming.

He thought about becoming a basketball coach, like one of his role models in high school. "But the townspeople got on his back," he recalled.

He also thought about the ministry. But he ended up majoring in business and pursuing an interest in accounting.

Avard Whitman, then Linfield registrar, was a friend and mentor in those days.

"He was a great guy, brilliant," Williams recalled. "I decided then to be a registrar."

The registrar's office keeps students' academic records for the present, the past and the future. The office also is responsible for graduation and for putting together a registration booklet so students can choose classes and sign up for them.

Williams sometimes called it "the NO office," since it was the only place on campus where people regularly heard the word "no." "No, you can't have that class. No, we can't change that grade. No, you're too late," he explained.

Saying no is OK, he said, as long as it's fair. "Besides, there were more yeses," he said.

Before Williams followed Whitman's example and became a Linfield registrar, he spent some time in the Air Force. The college tried to get the 1955 graduate out of the draft, he said, but it didn't work.

The Air Force took Williams and his new bride first to Texas, where he was an academic instructor, then to Morocco, where he worked in information services.

Back in the U.S., Williams returned to Linfield for a master's degree and teaching certificate, then taught school in Wyoming and Michigan. He came back to Linfield for good as an assistant professor and dean of men.

He became associate professor of education and Upward Bound director in 1970, then added the title of special services director.

Registrar
In 1977, he became registrar on a half-time basis; he also coordinated alumni affairs and continued as an education professor. Finally, a year later, he became the full-time registrar.

In the ensuing years, he also held other jobs as well. In addition to his registrar duties, he taught education. And at various times, he served as acting dean of academic affairs, directed the Portland campus or assisted vice presidents.

He also served on numerous committees. He chaired two searches for academic deans and helped with searches for new presidents, including Charles Walker and his successor, Vivian Bull.
He even chaperoned a group of students in Costa Rica one year. "Any time I got restless, I got another job," he said.

After Williams officially retired, he continued working for Linfield on a volunteer basis. In 2001, he raised money -- as part of the college's "The Defining Moment" capital campaign -- for a student study room in the new (it opened fall 2003) Nicholson Library, to honor the late Mike Barrow, a Linfield 1968 graduate and former Linfield Wildcat quarterback (as of April 2009, he still held Linfield football career and single-season records), who died in Vietnam while serving in the U.S. Army shortly. Barrow's tour of duty in Vietnam began April 3, 1969, and he died June 23, 1969. Those who donated to fund the study room were called "Dream Team" by Williams. See photo of plaque in study room.

A sports fan, he also continued his association with the athletics department. He had been faculty athletic representative, overseeing athletic eligibility for 26 years. And he was a key person in winning the bids to hold championship football games in McMinnville in the 1980s.

In 2001, he was inducted into the Linfield Athletics Hall of Fame for his efforts.

During his years as registrar, Williams sometimes called himself one of the short-timers, because two other people had worked there far longer than he. Smith and Cochran did a great job, he said, and they could remember all the students they had worked with - an advantage in record-keeping.

Smith and Cochran also moved smoothly from typewriter and computer punch cards to modern-day computers, Williams said, but he found it a little harder. "I wanted one to do e-mail, but I didn't get one for a while," he said.

Williams enjoys having a computer now.

His wife said, "He spends a lot of time on it. I'm so glad he has something that interests him at home."

The computer sits in his home office, which is decorated with the covers of albums produced by son Gregg, covers of magazines in which son Ken Jr. has articles and numerous plaques related to Linfield and athletics.

He also has a Pepsi advertisement created by his nephew. "I'm a Pepsi man," he said.

Musical family
Both Williams and his wife enjoy music, although he claims that the only instrument he can play is the player piano.

Their four children all are musical. In fact, two are in the music business.

Gregg, the producer, has played drums on tour with Sheryl Crow and other artists. Brent plays and markets music. Ken Jr. plays guitar when he takes a break from his career as a neurological research scientist at Harvard University. Brenda, who works for the state of Washington, plays piano as a hobby.

"Gail sang in choirs, but I think the kids got it from our love and appreciation of music. And they certainly have educated us," Williams said.

Nowadays he and his wife enjoy newer groups suggested by their sons, in addition to attending performances by the Linfield Chamber Orchestra.

Williams also goes to ball games at Linfield sometimes. And he likes watching sports on TV.
He and Gail rent DVDs, favoring family movies, comedies and foreign films. They go to plays in Portland, too.

"I like to say I read, but I don't," he said. "We have no lawn to mow anymore and Gail does the flowers, so I don't have to do much."

After more than 30 years on a one-acre property on Westside Road, they moved into McMinnville recently. They like being closer to people and activities.

Above all, Williams said, he and his wife enjoy spending time with friends